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Icmind Answer Sheets - As We Have Discussed, Competency Models Describe The Behaviors And Skills Manager Need To Exhibit If Any Organization Is To Be Successful

Assignment Solutions, Case study Answer sheets Project Report and Thesis contact [email protected] www.mbacasestudyanswers.com ARAVIND – 09901366442 – 09902787224 Leadership NOTE: Attempt any Four Case Studies with all Questions. All questions carry equal marks. Case: 01: Richard Branson Shoots for Moon Case: 02: “Can Disney Save Disney?” Case: 03: “Developing Leaders at UPS” Case: 04: “Paying Attention Pays off Andra Rush” Case: 05: “Integrating Terms at Hernandez & Associates” Case: 06: “Keeping up with Bills Gates” Case: 1: Richard Branson Shoots for Moon The virgin Group is the umbrella for a variety of business ventures ranging from air travel to entertainment. With close to 200 companies over 30 countries, it is one of the largest companies in the world. At the head of this huge organization is Richard Branson. Branson founded virgin over 30 years ago and has built organization from a small student magazine multibillion-dollar enterprise it is today. Branson is not your typical CEO. Branson’s dyslexia (difficulty in recognizing & understanding written language) made school a struggle and sabotaged (deliberate destruction /resistance Damage) his performance on standard IQ tests. His teachers and tests had no way of measuring his greatest strengths-his uncanny (strange-Supernatural) knack (skills-ability) for uncovering lucrative (productive) business ideas and his ability to energize the ambitions of others so that they, like he, could rise to the level of their dreams. Richard Branson’s true talents began to show themselves in his late teens. While a student at Stowe School in England in 1968, Branson decided to start his own magazine, Student. Branson was inspired by the student activism on his campus in the sixties and decided to try something different. Student differs from most college newspapers & magazines; it focused on the student & there interests. Branson sold advertisings to major corporations to support his magazine. He included articles by ministers of Parliament, rock stars, intellectuals & celebrities. Student grew to become a commercial success. In 1970 Branson saw an opportunity for student to offer records cheaply by running ads for mail-order delivery. The subscribers to student flooded the magazine with so many orders that his profit spin-off discount music venture proved more lucrative than the magazine subscriptions. Branson required the staff of student for his discount music business. He built a small recording studio and signed his first artist. Mike Oldfield recorded “Tubular Bells” at Virgin in 1973; the album sold 5 million copies. Virgin Records & the Virgin brand name were born. Branson has gone on to start his own airline (Virgin Atlantic Airlines was launched in 1984), build hotels (Virgin Hotels started in 1988), and get into the personal finance business (Virgin Direct Personal finance Services was launched in 1995), and even enter the cola wars (Virgin Cola was launched in 1994). And those are just a few of highlights of the virgin group-all this while Branson has attempted to break world speed records for crossing the Atlantic Ocean by boat hot air balloon. As you might guess that Branson’s approach is nontraditional–he have no giant corporate office or staff & few of any board meetings. Instead, he keeps each enterprise small and relies on his skills of empowering people’s ideas to fuel success. When a flight attendant form Virgin Airlines approached him with a vision of a wedding business, Richard told her to go do it. He even put on a wedding dress himself to help launch the publicity. Virgin Brides was born. Branson relies heavily on the creativity of his staff; he is more a supporter of new ideas then a creator of them. He encourages searches for new business ideas everywhere he goes and even has a spot on the virgin Website “Got a Big Idea?” In December 1999, Richard Branson was awarded a knighthood in Queen’s Millennium New Year’s Honours List for “Services to entrepreneurship”. What’s next on Branson’s list? He recently announced that Virgin was investing money in “trying to make sure that, in the not too distance future, people from around the world will be able to go into space.” Not everyone is convinced that space tourism can become fully fledged part of the travel industry, but with Branson behind the idea it just fly. Questions: 1. Would you classify Richard Branson as a manager or a Leader? What qualities distinguish him as one over the other? 2. Followers are part of the leadership process – Describe the relationship between Branson and his followers. 3. Identify the Myths of leadership development that Richard Branson’s Success helps to disprove. Case: 2: “Can Disney Save Disney?” The Disney name identifies an institution whose $22billion in annual sales makes it the world’s largest media company. It was Walt Disney’s creative leadership that established the Disney Company as one of the leader in American business. Walt Disney and his brother Roy started Disney Brothers Studio in Hollywood in 1923. Artistically, in 1930s were Disney’s best years. Walt Disney embraced (Make use of) new advances in color and sound, and put his team of enthusiastic young artists to pursue the most sophisticated techniques of the day. Disney risked everything on his first feature film, snow white and the Seven Dwarfs, released in 1937. Audiences loved it. His focus on the positive and life-affirming themes he introduced into all his work provided much-needed smiles and laughter for audiences during the depths of the great Depression. Roy Disney became chairman after Walt died of lung cancer in 1966. In 1971 Roy died and his son, Roy E. Disney, became the company’s principle individual share holder. In 1984 new CEO Michael Eisner and president Frank Wells ushered (introduces strangers at formal events) in an era of innovation and prosperity. They instituted marathon meetings for generating creative ideas, forcing everyone to work grueling (demanding-tough-hard) hours. The approach worked, and for the first 10 years of his tenure, Eisner was considered a genius. He revived Disney’s historic animation unit, invested in the theme parks, led the expansion in to Europe, and breathed new life in to the company by partnering with cutting age companies like Pixar and Miramax. Eisner built Disney into a formidable media power-hose, boosting its profits sixfold and sending its share price soaring almost 60000 percent. But more recent years have been challenging for Eisner and Disney Company. Eisner’s initial magical effect has lost its shine and his more recent actions and decisions have had less-than-desirable effects on the company. Roy Disney, the last of founding family to work at company. Quit the board in 2003 and began a company to try and oust Eisner. In his letter of resignation Disney asserted that Eisner has become an ineffective leader, claiming that Eisner consistently “micro-manages” everyone, resulting in loss of morale. He saw Eisner’s cost-conscious decisions to shut down an Orlando animation studio and cut cost at theme parks as resulting in “creative brain drain” and creating the perception that the company is looking for “quick buck” solutions rather than long-term value. Disney also cited Eisner’s inability to maintain successful relationship creative partners like Pixar and Miramax (both contracts with these studios were not renewed) and his lack of a succession plan as dangerous to the future of the company. Eisner ultimately lost his bid to retain his position as CEO and was forced to resign in 2005, one year before his contracts as CEO expired. Questions: 1. Consider Walt Disney’s effectiveness in terms of the three domains of leadership- the leader, the followers, and situation. For each domain name factors that contributed to Disney’s success. 2. Now think about Michael Eisner’s Leadership effectiveness. Name factors within the three domains of leadership that might be responsible for controversy surrounding Eisner’s success and then ultimate failure and removal as Disney’s CEO. Case: 3: “Developing Leaders at UPS” UPS is the nation’s fourth largest company with 357,000 employees worldwide and operations in more than 200 countries. UPS is constantly recognized as one of the “top companies to work for” and was recognized by Fortune as one of the 50 best companies for minorities. A major reason for UPS’s success is the commitment to its employees. UPS understand the importance to of providing both education and experience for its next generation of leaders-spending $300 million dollars annually on education programs for employees and encouraging promotion within. All employees are offered equal opportunities to build the skills and knowledge they need to succeed. A perfect example of this is Jovita Carranza. Jovita Carranza joined UPS in 1976 as a part-time clerk in Los Angeles. Carranza demonstrated a strong work ethic and a commitment to UPS, and UPS rewarded her with opportunities-opportunities Carranza was not shy about taking advantage of By 1985 Carranza was the workforce planning manager in metro LA By 1987 she was district human resource manager based in Central Texas. By 1990 she had accepted a move to district human resource manager in Illinois. She received her first operations assignment, as division manager of hub, package, and feeder operations; in Illinois in 1996 she accepted the same role in Wisconsin. By 1999 Carranza’s progressive success led UPS to promote her to president of Americas Region. From there she moved into her current position as vice-president of UPS Air Operations, based in Louisville, Kentucky. The $1.1 billion air hub she currently oversees sprawls across the equivalent of more than 80 football fields. It can handle 304,000 packages an hour, its computers process nearly 1 million transactions a minute, and it serves as the lynchpin for the $33 billion business that has become the world’s largest package-delivery company. Carranza attributes much of her success to her eagerness to take on new challenges: “The one error that people make early on in their careers is that they’re very selective about opportunities so they avoid some prefer others.” She says. “I always accept all opportunities that presented themselves because from each one you can learn something, and they serve as a platform for future endeavors.” It has also been important, she says, to surround herself with capable, skilled employees who are loyal to the company and committed to results. After nearly 30 years with UPS, it is teamwork, interaction, and staff development that Carranza says is one of the achievements of which she is proudest: “Because that takes focus, determination, sincerity to perpetuate the UPS culture and enhance it through people.” Carranza’s corporate achievements, determination, drive, innovation, and leadership in business have earned her the distinction of being named Hispanic Business Magazine’s Woman of the year. She credits her parents, both of Mexican descent, with teaching her “the importance of being committed, of working hard, and doing so with a positive outlook,” principles she continue to guide her personal and professional life. The principles mirror those of the company whose corporate leader she has climbed nonstop, an organization she says that values diversity, encourages quality, integrity, commitment, fairness, loyalty, and social responsibility, among other values. Among Carranza’s worlds of wisdom: “…sit back and listen and observe,” she says. “You learn more by not speaking. Intelligent people learn from their own experiences; with wisdom, you learn from other people’s mistake. I’m very methodical about that.” Questions: 1. What are the major skills Jovita Carranza has demonstrated in her career at UPS that have made her a successful leader? 2. Consider the spiral of experience that Jovita Carranza has travelled. How has her experience affected her ability as a leader? 3. List out the characteristics of successful leaders. How many of this is demonstrated by Jovita Carranza? Case: 04: “Paying Attention Pays off Andra Rush” Paying attention has been the key for Andra Rush. As a nursing school graduate she was paying attention when other nurses complained about unfair treatment and decided she wanted to do something about it—so she enrolled in the University of Michigan’s MBA program so she could do something about how employees were treated. As she completed her business courses and continued to work as a nurse, she was paying attention when a patient described his experience in the transport business. The Business sounded Intriguing, and so, with minimal experience and minimal resources. Rush took a risk and started her own trucking business. She scraped together the funds to buy three trucks by borrowing money from family and maxxing out her credit cards. She specialized in emergency shipping and accepts every job that came her way, even if it meant driving the truck. She paid attention to her customers and made a point of exceeding their expectations regardless of the circumstance. When the terrorist attacks of September 11 shut down local bridges, Rush rented a barge to make sure a crucial shipment for Diamler Chryusler made it to its destination on time. Rush continues to pay attention and credits her listening skills as a major reason for her success. Rush is distinct in the traditionally white male –dominated trucking industry –a woman and minority (Rush is Native American) who credits her heritage and the “enormous strength” of her Mohawk grandmother for helping her prevail. “It is entirely possible that my native sprit, communicated to me by my grandmother and my immediate family, have enabled me to overcome the isolation, historical prejudice, and business environment viewed as a barrier to native and woman owned businesses. The willingness to listen, to understand first, and act directly and honestly with integrity is a lesson and code of conduct my elders have bequeathed to me. Being an entrepreneur has reinforced those lessons again and again.’’ Her Mohawk heritage is pervasive. Rush’s company logo is a war staff with six feathers representing the six nations of the Iroquois: Mohawk, Onondaga, Oneida, Cayuga, Tuscarora and Seneca. She believes in the power of a diverse work force and as a result more than half of the 390 employees at Rush Trucking are women and half are Minorities. Rush Keeps close tabs on her company and its Employees. Thought the company has grown from its humble three-truck beginning to a fleet of 1,7000 trucks, Rush still takes time to ride along with driver. She has provided educational Programs like “The Readers’Edge,” a literacy program, to improve the skills and lives of her employees. Rush is actively involved in several organizations that work to improve the positions of minorities—she’s on the boards of directors of the Michigan Minority Business Development Council, Minority Enterprise Development/Minority Business Development Agency, Minority Business Roundtable, and has served as president of the Native American Business Alliance. Question:- 1. As we have discussed, competency models describe the behaviors and skills manager need to exhibit if any organization is to be successful. Consider the general competencies found in figure 8.3 and apply these to Andra Rush, providing example of why these competencies apply. 2. Mentoring has played a role in the careers of many successful minorities in leadership positions. Who could be identified as a coach or mentor for Andra Rush? 3. Consider some of the self-defeating behaviors outlines in this chapter that contribute to management derailment. What lessons has Andra Rush obviously learned from the failure of others? Case: 05: “Integrating Terms at Hernandez & Associates” Marco Hernandez is president of Hernandez & Associate Inc., a full- service advertising agency with clients across North America. The company provides a variety of marketing services to support its diverse group of clients. Whether called on to generate a strategic plan, create interactive Web sites, or put together a full- blown media campaign, the team at Hernandez & associates prides itself on creative solutions to its clients’ marketing challenges. The firm was founded in 1990 with an emphasis in the real estate industry. It quickly expanded its client base to include health care, as well as food and consumer products. Like many small firms the company grew quickly in the “high-flyinf”1990s, but its administrative costs to obtain and service businesses also skyrocketed. And, as with many businesses, the agency’s business was greatly affected by the terrorist attacks of September 11 and the economic downturn that followed. Clients’ shrinking budgets forced them to scale back their business with Hernandez & Associates and cut backs in staffing meant clients needs more marketing support services as opposed to full scale campaigns. Hernandez& Associates now faced a challenge—to adapt its business to focus on what the clients were asking for. Specifically, clients, with their reduces staffs, were looking for help responding to their customers’ request and looking for ways to make the most of their more limited marketing budgets. Its small, cohesive staff of 20 employees needed to make some changes and quickly. As president of Hernandez & Associates, Marco Hernandez Knew his tram was up for the challenge. He had worked hard to create environments to support a successful team—he recruited people who has solid agency experience and he consistently communicated the firm’s mission to his team, he made sure the team has all the resources it needed to success and constantly took stock of the resources. He has built his team as he built his business and knew the group would respond to his leadership. But where to start? Getting the team to understand that growth depended on a shift in how it serviced its clients was not difficult—each of the employees of the small firm had enough contact with the clients that they knew client needs were changing. But making significant changes to the status quo at Hernandez & associates would be difficult. Group roles has to change—creative folks has to think about how to increase a client’s phone inquiries and Web site visits; account people needed a better understanding of the client’s desire for more agency leadership. And everyone has to have better sense of the costs involved. The company as a whole needed a more integrated approach to servicing their clients if they hoped to survive. Marco needed a plan. Question:- 1. Like many leader, Marco has team in place and does not have the luxury of building a new team from the ground up to adapt to the changing business environment his firm is face with, Use the TLM to help Marco diagnose the problems faced by the firm and identify leverage points for change. a. Consider the major functions of the TLM—input process and output where do most of the firm’s challenges fall? b. What are the team’s goals for outputs? 2. Identify potential resources for Marco and his team in implementing a strategy to change the way they do business at Hernandez & Associates. Case: 06: “Keeping up with Bills Gates” Bills Gates inherited intelligence, ambition, and a competitive spirit form his father, a successful seattle attorney. After graduating from a private prep school in seattle, he enrolled in Harvard but dropped out to pursue his passion – computer programming. Paul Allen, a friend from prep school, presented gates with the idea of writing a version of the BASIC computer language for the Altair8800, one of the first personal computers on the market. Driven by his competitive nature, Gates decided he wanted to be the first personal computer on the market. Driven by his competitive nature, Gates decided he wanted to be the first to develop a language to make the personal computer accessible for the general public. He and Allen established the Microsoft Corporation in 1975. Gate’s passion and skill were programming- he would work night and day to meet the extremely aggressive deadlines he set for himself and his company. Eventually Gates has to bring in other programmers – he focused on recent college graduates. “we decided that we want them to come with clear minds, not polluted by some other approach, to learn the ways that we liked to develop software, and to put the kind of energy into it that we thought was key.” In the early days of Microsoft, Gates was in charge of product planning and programming while Allen was in charge of the business side. He motivated his programmers with the claim that whatever deadline was looming, no matter how tight, he could beat it personally if he had to. What eventually developed at Microsoft was a culture in which Gates was king. Everyone working under Gates was made to feel they were lesser programmers who couldn’t Compete with his skill or drive, so they competed with each other. They worked long hours and tried their best to mirror Gates—his drive, his ambition, his skill. This internal competition motivated the programmers and made Microsoft one of the most successful companies in the computer industry, and one of the most profitable. The corporation has creates a tremendous amount of wealth—many of its employees have become millionaires while working at Microsoft, including, of course, Bill Gates, currently one of the richest men in the world. During the 1990s, Bill Gate’s net worth grew at an average rate of $34 million per day; that’s $200 million per week. Gates need a castle for his kingdom and so he built a much talked-about his house on Lake Washington. The house lies mainly underground and looks like a set of separate buildings when viewed from above. The house was conceived as a showcase for Microsoft technology—it took $60 million, seven years of planning and construction, and three generations of computer hardware before is was finally finished. A feature of the house that reveals a lot about it owner is the house’s system of electronic badges. These badges let the house computer know where each resident and visitor is in the house. The purpose of the badges is to allow the computer to adjust the climate and music and to match the preferences of the people in the house as they move from room to room. What happen when more than one person is in a room? The computer defaults to Gate’s personal preferences. Questions:- 1. Would you classify Bill Gates as a charismatic or transformational leader? Why? 2. Consider followers/employees of gates. What are some of the unique characteristics of Gate’s followers that might identify him as a charismatic or transformational? Assignment Solutions, Case study Answer sheets Project Report and Thesis contact [email protected] www.mbacasestudyanswers.com ARAVIND – 09901366442 – 09902787224

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